LOCAL NEWS

‘Snoopy’ Opens Friday

“Snoopy: The Musical” opens Friday at the Vanity Theater with the popular Peanuts Gang taking center stage. Not only will the show have the seven main characters, but nearly 40 youth will take part in the production after earning a spot from participating in a theater workshop.

Director John Blair and Lisa Kochert Warren, choreographer and producer, put on the youth workshop in February. The purpose of the workshop was to target children who might not ever attend an audition. Blair and Warren wanted to give children the opportunity to be a part of a stage production. The two seasoned youth workers believed the workshop would be well attended — and it was.

“We know the young people in Montgomery County love theater and that has been proven time and time again,” Blair said. “The Vanity Theater gives kids a great opportunity to come to a safe place and experience the joys of being on stage with no worries and not being judged.”

Nicholson Elementary second-grade student Ruba Brewer said he was starting to feel a little nervous about opening night.

“I am kinda scared,” Ruba said. “This is my first time on a stage and I don’t want to mess up.”

Emery Allen, a New Market Elementary third-grade student, is feeling different about being on the Vanity Theater stage. She is a seasoned veteran of several local theatrical productions. She said she participated in the workshop because she had friends involved who had never been on stage. She said helping her friends has been fun.

“I thought the workshop was fun,” Allen said. “I have had to help my friends quite a bit actually.”

The youth will participate in the production in two different groups divided into ages. Kindergarten through third-graders and grades four through eight. Each group will be involved in a large production including singing and dance.

Blair said the inexperienced youth have been tremendous to work with.

“The kids, including the little ones, have been fantastic,” Blair said. “They were well-behaved and listened well. They have done everything we have asked them to do.”

Snoopy: The Musical, which is sponsored by the Journal Review, will have seven adult entertainers. It is a musical comedy by Larry Grossman and Hal Hackady. The characters are from the Charles M. Schulz comic strip Peanuts. The production, which is a sequel to the musical “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown” focuses more on the life of Snoopy.

The musical is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. The production also can be seen at 7:30 p.m. March 17 and 18 and at 2 p.m. March 19.

Tickets are available online at www.sugarcreekplayers.org or by calling the theater at 765-362-7077. 

Pre-K, roads on menu at breakfast

Luke is a 12-year-old boy who lives in a single parent household with several friends of the family. His mom describes him as good kid who does pretty well in school and never gets into any trouble. She said he is not really the daring type but is more cautious though not shy. She added that Luke is laid back and a good listener. One of the reasons she wants him to have a mentor is to help him be more outgoing and to learn to try new things without fear. He can be quiet at first, but will start to open up once he gets comfortable with someone.

Luke likes school and his favorite subject is math. He likes to play pool, ride bikes, play computer games, baseball, basketball, bowling, WWE Wrestling, watch movies, do craft projects and visit museums. His perfect day would be playing with remote control cars, going out to eat at Taco Bell and learning how to ride a four-wheeler. 

Luke is a sweet somewhat sensitive kid who is easy to talk to. He would really love a mentor so he can have someone to do fun activities with and to get him out of the house. Luke would make a great match with a male who understands the struggles of childhood and who could help Luke build confidence in himself and open him up to new things. 

If you believe you would enjoy spending time with Luke and would like to become a mentor, contact Jill Hampton at 765-362-0694, ext. 103 or email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for further information.

To learn more about the Montgomery County Youth Service Bureau, visit www.mcysb.org or visit them on their Facebook page at www.face-book.com/mcysb.

The Montgomery County Youth Service Bureau is a MUFFY Partner Agency.

Dancing and Giving Back

North Montgomery High School junior Ashlynn Voorhees sees first-hand every day the good effect the work of the Montgomery County Youth Service Bureau has on her fellow high school students. Voorhees is a part of 10 dancing couples that were introduced Saturday as the participants in the 2017 Dancing With the Montgomery County Stars , which is the YSB’s largest fund raiser of the year. The popular event is scheduled for May 20 and will be held at Wabash College.

“I go to school with students who the Youth Service Bureau helps,” Voorhees said. “I see the kids who need the help and I want to help them. That is why I am dancing this year.”

Each dancer and dance professional agreed they had a desire to help the children that the Y.S.B. reaches. As a group, each dancer saw the event as not a way to show their dancing talent, but as a way to give back to the community that they either live or work in.

Dance professional Wayne Applegate teaches ballroom dance in Lafayette to troubled youth as therapy. He has been the Wabash College Diving coach for 20 years, and his work with youth inspired him to participate in this year’s fund raising event. This is the first year Applegate will serve as a professional.

“I want to give back to the community and help the kids,” Applegate said. “I am pleased to have been offered the chance to participate in this great event.”

Applegate’s partner is Northridge Middle School teacher Dede Groves. She had a similar reason as Voorhees and Applegate because she too understands the need for the Y.S.B. as she works with students.

“I work with students every day and see the troubles they go through,” Groves said. “Kids are faced with so many challenges today that I wanted to help raise money for the Youth Service Bureau. I feel Dancing with the Stars is a great cause.”

This year’s group of professional dancers has veterans and new-comers. The “Stars” are once again comprised of individuals who are willing to go in front of 800 people because of the cause to help Montgomery County youth.

Dancer Bill Warren said he sees the event as an opportunity to expand his assistance to local youth. Warren, who is a 19-year member of the Indiana State Police and assistant wrestling coach at North Montgomery, is paired with veteran professional Amber Raine Swick.

“Dancing with the Stars gives me another chance to work for the youth of the county I grew up in,” Warren said. “This is a great way to support youth programs offered by the Youth Service Bureau.”

Franciscan Health Crawfordsville’s Matt Oates, who is a member of the hospital’s Community Health Assessment Needs Committee, does not consider himself a dancer. However, he said the event will allow him to expand help to youth which is important to his employer. Franciscan Health Crawfordsville is the title sponsor of this year’s event.

“At the hospital we want to help kids live healthy lives,” Oates said. “Working with community health assessment I see the needs and I want to help the Youth Service Bureau meet those needs.”

The Y.S.B. will place the $45 individual tickets on sale at a later date in April. However, sponsorship tables are now being sold. There are a variety of sponsorship levels available. 

Silent Auction items are being collected now. To sponsor a table, or to donate an auction item, contact the Y.S.B at 362-0694.

Dancing and Giving Back

North Montgomery High School junior Ashlynn Voorhees sees first-hand every day the good effect the work of the Montgomery County Youth Service Bureau has on her fellow high school students. Voorhees is a part of 10 dancing couples that were introduced Saturday as the participants in the 2017 Dancing With the Montgomery County Stars , which is the YSB’s largest fund raiser of the year. The popular event is scheduled for May 20 and will be held at Wabash College.

“I go to school with students who the Youth Service Bureau helps,” Voorhees said. “I see the kids who need the help and I want to help them. That is why I am dancing this year.”

Each dancer and dance professional agreed they had a desire to help the children that the Y.S.B. reaches. As a group, each dancer saw the event as not a way to show their dancing talent, but as a way to give back to the community that they either live or work in.

Dance professional Wayne Applegate teaches ballroom dance in Lafayette to troubled youth as therapy. He has been the Wabash College Diving coach for 20 years, and his work with youth inspired him to participate in this year’s fund raising event. This is the first year Applegate will serve as a professional.

“I want to give back to the community and help the kids,” Applegate said. “I am pleased to have been offered the chance to participate in this great event.”

Applegate’s partner is Northridge Middle School teacher Dede Groves. She had a similar reason as Voorhees and Applegate because she too understands the need for the Y.S.B. as she works with students.

“I work with students every day and see the troubles they go through,” Groves said. “Kids are faced with so many challenges today that I wanted to help raise money for the Youth Service Bureau. I feel Dancing with the Stars is a great cause.”

This year’s group of professional dancers has veterans and new-comers. The “Stars” are once again comprised of individuals who are willing to go in front of 800 people because of the cause to help Montgomery County youth.

Dancer Bill Warren said he sees the event as an opportunity to expand his assistance to local youth. Warren, who is a 19-year member of the Indiana State Police and assistant wrestling coach at North Montgomery, is paired with veteran professional Amber Raine Swick.

“Dancing with the Stars gives me another chance to work for the youth of the county I grew up in,” Warren said. “This is a great way to support youth programs offered by the Youth Service Bureau.”

Franciscan Health Crawfordsville’s Matt Oates, who is a member of the hospital’s Community Health Assessment Needs Committee, does not consider himself a dancer. However, he said the event will allow him to expand help to youth which is important to his employer. Franciscan Health Crawfordsville is the title sponsor of this year’s event.

“At the hospital we want to help kids live healthy lives,” Oates said. “Working with community health assessment I see the needs and I want to help the Youth Service Bureau meet those needs.”

The Y.S.B. will place the $45 individual tickets on sale at a later date in April. However, sponsorship tables are now being sold. There are a variety of sponsorship levels available. 

Silent Auction items are being collected now. To sponsor a table, or to donate an auction item, contact the Y.S.B at 362-0694.

Farmers market is calling all vendors

The call for vendors at the Crawfordsville Farmers’ Market has been made by the market organizer, Crawfordsville Main Street. 

All interested vendors are invited to an organizational meeting at 6 p.m. Wednesday at the Crawfordsville District Public Library, 205 S. Washington St. 

CMS president Sue Lucas said the purpose of the meeting is to get information to anyone wanting to have booth space at the market this season.

“The Farmers’ Market is growing,” Lucas said. “We will have a lot of information for vendors and we hope we find committed vendors who will offer local produce and foods.”

As in year’s past, craft makers and artisans also are invited to participate at the market, which begins April 29.

To help answer vendor questions at the meeting, Lucas has secured representatives from the Montgomery County Health Department, Purdue University Extension and Alan Goff, an expert on weights and measures.

“There are rules and regulations that we ask our vendors to abide by,” Lucas said. “For any vendor, and especially new ones, we will have the experts at the meeting to answer questions pertaining to selling and marketing produce.”

For the second year, there will be a vendor fee. The fee is $60 an entire season. There is also a fee of $10 per day for vendors who might not have something to sell every week such as a sweet corn.

Vendors will be required to have liability insurance.

Lucas said this year the market will offer space to non-profit organizations and businesses who have information they would like to pass along to the community.

“We want to offer non-reserved space to non-profits to get their information out about what they do,” Lucas said. “We also are wanting any business to set up to promote their products or services.”

Lucas said non-profit organizations and businesses will not be allowed to compete with vendors by selling any items, but are welcome to hand out free materials.

Construction of downtown’s pocket park, located next to the Farmers’ Market on Pike Street, will take place this summer. Lucas said watching the progress of the park construction will be an added bonus for market goers.

“With our music, and the Pike Place construction plus new vendors, we are looking forward to an exciting season at the Farmers’ Market,” Lucas said.

Rules and the application to become a vendor can be viewed and downloaded at www.crawfordsvillemainstreet.com/farmers-market.